KFF Health Tracking Poll – March 2022: Economic Concerns and Health Policy, The ACA, and Views of Long-term Care Facilities


Key Findings

  • Because the nation’s economic system and rising costs are on the forefront of the general public’s thoughts, the newest KFF Well being Monitoring Ballot finds the general public needs lawmakers to prioritize out-of-pocket well being care prices as Congress debates present well being legislative priorities. A majority of the general public (61%) say limiting how a lot drug firms can enhance the worth of prescribed drugs every year to not surpass the speed of inflation ought to be a “prime precedence” for Congress. Slight majorities additionally say capping out-of-pocket prices for insulin at $35 a month (53%) and inserting a restrict on out-of-pocket prices for seniors (52%) are prime priorities for Congress to take motion on within the coming months. Majorities throughout partisans say lots of the well being care priorities requested about are necessary for Congress to work on within the coming months.
  • As many individuals transfer on from the COVID-19 pandemic, solely a couple of quarter of the general public say offering extra funding to proceed the COVID-19 pandemic response (25%) or making everlasting the monetary assist that was a part of the COVID-19 reduction invoice for individuals who purchase their very own insurance coverage (21%) are prime congressional well being care priorities.
  • Twelve years for the reason that passage of the Inexpensive Care Act, a majority of the general public (55%) proceed to view the regulation favorably, however opinions in the direction of the 2010 well being reform regulation are nonetheless divided by partisanship. Majorities of Democrats (87%) maintain favorable views of the regulation and plenty of (43%) say the regulation has immediately helped them and their households. On the opposite facet of the political aisle, most Republicans (79%) view the regulation unfavorably and 4 in ten say the ACA has damage them and their households.
  • The No Surprises Act went into impact earlier this 12 months and started defending individuals with personal medical insurance from receiving shock out-of-network medical payments once they obtained care from an in-network hospital. Nevertheless, greater than half of adults, 18-64, with personal insurance coverage say they know nothing in any respect about this laws (56%), with a further one in 5 (22%) saying they solely know “a little bit.”
  • With a renewed focus from the Biden administration on reforming long-term care services resembling nursing houses which have been a lot within the information throughout the COVID pandemic, KFF polling finds majorities of adults say this nation’s nursing houses, assisted dwelling services, and different long-term services are doing a “unhealthy job” of sustaining sufficient staffing ranges (70%), providing inexpensive care (64%), or offering high-quality care to residents (54%). Views of the kind of care supplied by long-term services is much more unfavorable among the many one-fourth of adults who’ve a direct, latest reference to a long-term care facility. However, many (55%) say the nation’s nursing houses are doing a “good job” of defending residents and employees from COVID-19.

Financial system and Inflation Are Public’s High Issues, Many Fear About Affording Primary Residing Bills

The most recent KFF polling finds greater than half of the general public (55%) say inflation and rising costs is the most important drawback going through the U.S. proper now, greater than thrice the share who say the identical about every other problem included within the survey. About one in 5 (18%) say the Russian invasion into neighboring Ukraine is the most important drawback going through the U.S., adopted by six p.c every who say the identical in regards to the COVID-19 pandemic, crime, and local weather change.

Inflation and rising costs is the highest problem throughout partisans, with about half of Democrats (46%) and independents (53%) and 7 in ten Republicans (70%) saying it’s the largest drawback going through the U.S. About one in 4 Democrats (23%) say the Russian invasion into Ukraine is the most important drawback, as do 17% of independents and 14% of Republicans. One in ten Democrats additionally say both local weather change (10%) or the COVID-19 pandemic (9%) is the nation’s largest drawback, however few Republicans agree.

The economic system, inflation, and rising costs are additionally the highest problem for voters because the nation begins the ramp as much as the 2022 midterm elections. When requested to call in their very own phrases the difficulty they assume can be most necessary when deciding which candidate to vote for, greater than one-third of voters (37%) supply responses associated to the economic system. A handful of different points additionally talked about by voters embrace local weather change (4%), crime (3%), the Russian invasion into Ukraine (3%), taxes (2%), the COVID-19 pandemic (2%), gasoline or vitality (2%), or immigration (2%).

In Their Personal Phrases: Fascinated with the 2022 congressional elections later this 12 months, what problem do you assume can be a very powerful?

“Individuals have to get again to work and costs want to come back down” – 57-year-old feminine, White non-Hispanic, Pennsylvania

“Rising worth of gasoline” – 69-year-old male, White non-Hispanic, California

“An important problem is economic system and somebody who can get the economic system began up once more” – 34-year-old male, Hispanic, New Jersey

“The warfare occurring in Ukraine” – 71-year-old male, Black, South Carolina

“Decreasing costs of gasoline and homes” – 24-year-old feminine, Hispanic, Texas

The economic system can also be the highest voting problem throughout partisan voters, with three in ten Democratic voters, greater than a 3rd of impartial voters (36%), and almost half of Republican voters (48%) providing financial points as their prime voting concern. Some partisan voters supply issues apart from coverage points as the most important driver of their vote, together with desirous to vote their get together’s candidates into workplace: one in ten (11%) Democratic voters say a very powerful factor to them is voting for Democratic candidates, whereas 6% of Republican voters supply voting Republican as a very powerful side of their voting determination.

Many Individuals are additionally involved about having the ability to afford primary dwelling bills for his or her households. A minimum of half say they’re both “very fearful” or “considerably fearful” about having the ability to afford gasoline or different transportation prices (71%), sudden medical payments (58%), or month-to-month utilities like electrical energy (50%). A minimum of 4 in ten are fearful about having the ability to afford meals (47%), long-term care companies for themselves or a member of the family (45%), their medical insurance deductible (44%), their lease or mortgage (43%), or their prescription drug prices (43%). A couple of-third (36%) are additionally fearful about having the ability to afford their month-to-month medical insurance premium. The share of people that say they’re now fearful about affording gasoline costs and month-to-month utilities has elevated since February 2020, when roughly 4 in ten have been fearful about paying for gasoline (40%) and month-to-month utilities (38%).

Worries about having the ability to afford dwelling bills are additionally largely depending on a person’s family revenue, with at the least six in ten of these dwelling in households with incomes of lower than $40,000 yearly saying they’re fearful about having the ability to afford gasoline or different transportation prices (79%), sudden medical payments (66%), month-to-month utilities (65%), their lease or mortgage (63%), or their meals prices (62%). Nevertheless, with gasoline costs averaging over $4 a gallon throughout the nation, a majority of people, no matter revenue, report worries about having the ability to afford gasoline or different transportation prices.

Along with worrying about affording well being care prices together with different family bills, half of adults (51%) report that they’ve delayed or gone with out medical companies resulting from prices up to now 12 months. This contains greater than one-third who’ve postpone dental companies (35%), and one-fourth who’ve postpone imaginative and prescient care (25%) or normal visits to their physician or well being care supplier (24%). Fewer say they’ve postpone psychological well being care (18%) or hospital companies (14%) resulting from price. One in ten say they’ve postpone listening to companies together with getting listening to aids resulting from price – together with one in 5 (18%) older adults (ages 65 and older) who report this.

Decreasing the worth of prescribed drugs has been a significant tenet of President Biden’s well being care agenda and a relentless supply of debate amongst legislators. The most recent polling finds three in ten adults (29%), together with 4 in ten (43%) adults with family incomes of lower than $40,000, saying they’ve both not crammed a prescription, reduce tablets in half or skipped doses, or taken an over-the-counter medicine as an alternative resulting from the price of their prescribed drugs.

The Public’s Well being Care priorities For Congress Are Targeted on Bringing Down Prices

With financial points on the forefront of the general public’s thoughts, it’s maybe unsurprising that the highest well being care priorities the general public needs Congress to give attention to contain controlling out-of-pocket prices for households and people. Six in ten (61%) say limiting how a lot drug firms can enhance the worth of prescribed drugs every year to not surpass the speed of inflation ought to be a “prime precedence” for Congress. Slight majorities additionally say capping out-of-pocket prices for insulin at $35 a month (53%) and inserting a restrict on out-of-pocket prices for seniors (52%) are prime priorities for Congress to take motion on within the coming months. About half of the general public (48%) proceed to say permitting the federal authorities to barter with drug firms to get a lower cost on prescribed drugs for individuals with Medicare is a prime precedence. 4 in ten say increasing well being protection to individuals with decrease incomes in states that haven’t expanded their Medicaid applications (42%), growing authorities funding for entry to psychological well being companies and coaching for psychological well being suppliers (42%), and taking federal motion to enhance the security and high quality of nursing residence care (40%) are prime priorities for Congress. Smaller shares say offering extra funding to proceed the COVID-19 pandemic response (25%) or making everlasting the monetary assist that was a part of the COVID-19 reduction invoice for individuals who purchase their very own insurance coverage (21%) ought to be prime congressional well being care priorities.

Throughout a lot of the well being care priorities requested about, majorities – no matter partisanship – say every is at the least an “necessary precedence” whereas many rise to the “prime precedence” extra usually amongst Democrats. Massive majorities of Democrats, independents, and Republicans say limiting how a lot drug firms can enhance the costs of prescribed drugs, permitting the federal authorities to barter with drug firms to get a lower cost on prescribed drugs for individuals with Medicare, capping out-of-pocket prices for insulin at $35 a month, taking federal motion to enhance the security and high quality of care in nursing houses, and growing authorities funding for entry to psychological well being care are necessary priorities for Congress to work on within the coming months. Smaller shares of Republicans say increasing protection for lower-income individuals dwelling in non-expansion states and offering extra funding for the COVID-19 pandemic response are necessary priorities for Congress.

Prescription drug prices

When the general public are requested which get together they assume deserves probably the most blame if Congress is unable to cross laws reducing the price of prescribed drugs, they place the blame evenly throughout policymakers from either side of the aisle. About half of the general public say that both President Biden (23%) or Democrats in Congress (29%) will deserve probably the most blame, whereas greater than 4 in ten (44%) say Republicans in Congress will deserve probably the most blame.

The overwhelming majority of Democrats say the blame will fall on Republicans in Congress (82%), whereas equal shares say the blame falls on President Biden (8%) and Democrats in Congress (8%). Amongst Republicans, Democrats in Congress get the vast majority of the blame (58%), whereas 29% say the blame will fall on President Biden. 4 in ten independents (43%) say Republicans in Congress will deserve probably the most blame, whereas about half say Democrats in Congress (24%) or President Biden (27%) will.

Inexpensive Care Act and No Surprises Act

On the 12th anniversary of the Inexpensive Care Act (ACA), the newest KFF polling finds a majority (55%) of the general public proceed to carry favorable views of the 2010 well being reform regulation. That is according to KFF polling from last fall with no vital adjustments amongst key demographic teams. Since 2017, views of the ACA have persistently been extra favorable than unfavorable, however are nonetheless largely pushed by partisanship: almost 9 in ten Democrats (87%) together with six in ten independents (58%) view the regulation favorably, whereas eight in ten Republicans (79%) maintain unfavorable views.

As well as, partisans maintain very completely different perceptions of whether or not the ACA has immediately helped or damage them and their households. 4 in ten Democrats (43%) say the ACA has “helped” them and their households, in comparison with one-fourth of independents (24%) and 7 p.c of Republicans. However, 4 in ten Republicans (40%) say the ACA has “damage” them, in comparison with one in six independents (16%) and 6 p.c of Democrats. A minimum of half of all adults, no matter self-identified get together affiliation, say the ACA has had “no direct influence” on them or their members of the family.

About half of those that say the ACA helped them say permitting somebody of their household to get or maintain their well being protection has been the principle manner the well being care regulation has helped them (48%, or 12% of complete adults). Three in ten say the regulation has made it simpler for them to get the well being care they want (7% of complete) and one in 5 say it has lowered the price of their well being care or medical insurance (5% of complete).

On the opposite facet, greater than half of those that say the ACA has damage them consider it has elevated the price of their well being care or medical insurance (59%, 12% of complete). That is greater than twice the share who say the principle manner the ACA has damage them is by making it tougher to get the care they want (22%, 5% of complete), or inflicting somebody of their household to lose their well being protection (11%, 2% of complete).

There are twelve states that haven’t expanded their Medicaid applications to cowl extra lower-income adults as a part of the ACA. Amongst these dwelling in non-expansion states, two-thirds (65%) say they assume their state ought to broaden Medicaid to cowl extra low-income uninsured individuals, whereas one-third (34%) say they assume their state ought to maintain Medicaid as it’s in the present day.

No Surprises Act

Earlier this 12 months, a new law went into impact defending individuals with personal medical insurance from receiving giant medical payments once they by accident obtained out-of-network care. Amongst adults, 18-64 years previous, with personal medical insurance, about one in 5 say they know “quite a bit” (3%) or “some” (18%) about this new regulation. Greater than half say they know nothing in any respect about this new regulation (56%) whereas one in 5 say they know “a little bit.” Notably, partisanship doesn’t appear to have affected consciousness of the No Surprises Act with related shares of Democrats (27%) and Republicans (22%) with personal medical insurance saying they knew “quite a bit” or “some” in regards to the regulation however at the least half saying they don’t know something.

Many Are Involved About High quality And Price Of Care At Lengthy-Time period Care Services

In his State of the Union deal with on March 1, 2022, President Biden announced steps to enhance look after residents at nursing houses, assisted dwelling, and different long-term care services. The most recent polling finds that just about half of adults (45%), together with 51% of adults 50 and older, fear about having the ability to afford long-term care companies like nursing residence care, and fewer than half price the standard and price of care at this nation’s nursing houses positively.

Majorities of adults say this nation’s nursing houses, assisted dwelling services, or different long-term services are doing a “unhealthy job” of sustaining sufficient staffing ranges (70%), providing inexpensive care (64%), or offering high-quality care to residents (54%). Nevertheless, many (55%) say the nation’s nursing houses are doing a “good job” of defending residents and employees from COVID-19.

Views of long-term care services are constant throughout age teams: majorities, no matter age, say the services are performing poorly in sustaining sufficient staffing and offering high-quality or providing inexpensive care. One-fourth (24%) of adults have a direct, latest reference to a long-term care facility, with them or a member of the family being a resident up to now three years. These people with a direct connection usually tend to say these services are doing a “unhealthy job” at providing inexpensive care (70%, in comparison with 62% of these with out a direct connection) or offering high-quality care (62% v. 51%).

As well as, 9 p.c of adults and 6 p.c of older adults, ages 65 and older, say there was time up to now twelve months once they or a member of the family didn’t get long-term care as a result of they couldn’t afford the associated fee.

Leave a Comment